Tree Roots and Cesspools Don’t Mix

Trees are a wonderful. They add beauty to your landscape, create shady spaces on hot, sunny days to enjoy, and welcome a host of wildlife that will enliven your yard.

There is nothing better than big, beautiful trees in your yard. In fact, many people who are on the market for a new house search for a yard with mature trees, or plant new trees in hopes that they will blossom so that they can enjoy all of the benefits that they have to offer. However, while trees are fantastic, if your home has a cesspool, they can cause major problems. It’s important to understand the dangers that trees can pose for cesspools so that you can avoid a potentially dangerous and expensive headache that could lead to a long island cesspool pumping.

Why Trees and Cesspools Don’t Mix

Trees have complex root systems that often grow tremendous in size. These root systems are vital, as they serve as food sources for trees. Cesspools have perforations throughout their sides, and these perforations are vital. They allow the water that collects in the cesspool to filter out into the soil, thereby avoiding overflow.

As trees grow, so do their root systems. If those roots are in the path of a cesspool, they can infiltrate the perforations along the sides of the tank, which can spell disaster. When roots grow through a cesspool, or around it, they can cause blockages (leading to needing cesspool pumping) or crush the tank, which means that you could be looking at a potential overflow or a cesspool that is completely damaged and needs to be replaced. Either way, you will have to deal with a huge, dangerous and costly mess.

The Most Harmful Trees for Cesspools

While all trees can do damage to a cesspool, there are certain types of trees that are almost assured to wreck havoc on a cesspool. Arborists highly recommend not planting the following trees within the proximity of a cesspool:

  • Elms
  • Willows
  • Walnuts
  • Birches
  • Poplars
  • Gums
  • Cypress’

These trees are particularly threatening to cesspools because their root systems are particularly strong and they seek out the closest and most abundant sources of water and nutrients, and a long island cesspool meet both of those needs.

Avoiding Cesspool Issues Caused by Tree Roots

If you wish to plant the above-mentioned trees in your yard, you should plant them at least 50 feet away from the cesspool. If you want to plant any of the above-mentioned trees in your yard, they should be placed at least 100 feet from the cesspool. The further any tree is from your cesspool, the better.

If you have established trees in your yard and you have a cesspool, measure their distance from the cesspool. If species that are particularly dangerous to cesspools are closer than 100 feet, or if other trees are closer than 50 feet, you should consider having them taken down to avoid potential issues in the future.

To find out if your cesspool is in danger of being damaged by existing trees in your yard, or if you are thinking about planting new trees in your yard, you should consult with a professional hampton bays cesspool pumping company. A professional will be able to assess your cesspool and your trees to determine if any issues are present and will be able to advise you on the proper placement for any new trees you may wish to plant.